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Different forms of identity theft

On Behalf of | Aug 25, 2022 | Criminal Defense |

Impersonating another person could leave someone facing felony charges related to identity theft. Often, identity thieves pretend to be another person to gain financial benefits illegally. However, other factors may motivate the behavior, such as impersonating someone on social media to hurt their personal or professional relationships. Such behaviors could lead someone into a New Jersey civil court. Other identity theft actions may lead to criminal charges.

Variations of identity theft

Social media identity theft could involve dubious activities, such as using someone’s identity and messenger account to solicit money from friends under false pretenses. Others may take someone’s identity to file to steal a tax refund or work under the person’s social security number. Social media and tax-related schemes reflect two examples of identity theft. There are several others.

Credit card and financial identity theft involves opening accounts in someone’s name or using the individual’s personal data to access these accounts. Some may engage in medical identity theft, which could be a variation of medical identity theft. In such instances, someone may pretend to be another person to use their health insurance policies.

Besides using a stolen identity to work illegally, some may seek unemployment or other benefits under the person’s name. Some identity thieves may attempt to use a child’s social security number or other personal information for illegal and unauthorized purposes.

Legal troubles for identity theft

State and federal criminal law statutes may support harsh punishments for those guilty of identity theft crimes. A defendant might look at several charges when arrested. Unfortunately, not everyone accused of identity theft is guilty. False accusations could happen, and some charges result from mistakes or miscommunication.

Some defendants might wish to enter into a plea arrangement with the prosecution. Such decisions could result in less severe penalties.